Wednesday, October 03, 2007

.NET Framework Source Code to be Released

This is really amazing !! Everybody was waiting for some major announcement today ! And here it is .....

"It's like some beautiful dream...

We are releasing the source code for .NET Framework base class libraries under the Microsoft Reference License, and the source code will be downloadable and viewable by anyone who accepts the license agreement.

In addition, Microsoft will introduce a capability in Visual Studio 2008 to allow you to debug into the .NET Framework source code using Visual Studio. With this capability, when you are stepping through code, you will be able to step into the source code for the .NET base class libraries.

This release will include the Base Class Libraries (BCL), Windows Forms, ASP.NET, System.Data, and WPF. BCL includes many of the basic classes in the framework including collections, string and text handling, IO,serialization, remoting, and others. We plan to include additional libraries into the set as time goes on."
source:Jim Galasyn's Learning Curve

That was just the sneak peek, Details to follow ! Keep a watch ! Scott Guthrie will be announcing soon the details,

So here are the DETAILS, the real details from Scott Guthrie, HOT off the press:

Releasing the Source Code for the .NET Framework Libraries

One of the things my team has been working to enable has been the ability for .NET developers to download and browse the source code of the .NET Framework libraries, and to easily enable debugging support in them.

Today I'm excited to announce that we'll be providing this with the .NET 3.5 and VS 2008 release later this year.

We'll begin by offering the source code (with source file comments included) for the .NET Base Class Libraries (System, System.IO, System.Collections, System.Configuration, System.Threading, System.Net, System.Security, System.Runtime, System.Text, etc), ASP.NET (System.Web), Windows Forms (System.Windows.Forms), ADO.NET (System.Data), XML (System.Xml), and WPF (System.Windows). We'll then be adding more libraries in the months ahead (including WCF, Workflow, and LINQ). The source code will be released under the Microsoft Reference License (MS-RL).

You'll be able to download the .NET Framework source libraries via a standalone install (allowing you to use any text editor to browse it locally). We will also provide integrated debugging support of it within VS 2008.

Integrated Visual Studio 2008 Debugging Support

The final release of VS 2008 will support the ability to configure the debugger to dynamically download the .NET Framework debugger symbols (and corresponding source code) from a web server hosted by Microsoft. You'll be able to configure the .NET Framework symbols to be downloaded all in one shot, or manually retrieved on demand:


Continue at source : Releasing the Source Code for the .NET Framework Libraries

3 comments:

Jignesh said...

What benefit does MS gets in releasing sourcecode? What is business motive behind it?

Athan said...

People who use to "hate" MS (aka open source freaks) will run, take the code and incorporate it to "their" own projects (e.g. Mono).
They will work for MS for free, porting the whole .NET crap to linux and other *nix platforms.

Vasudev said...

I a not sure about MS but surely developers will be benefited. And indirectly MS also will be beneficial, when their products are being used by developers and if finds any bug in the code , he can submit feedback at product feedback center
http://connect.microsoft.com/feedback/default.aspx?SiteID=210
Thus its the MS products getting improved.
And this is what Anand Iyer's Blog says:
Why are we doing this?
Primary reason : to enable deeper debugger integration.
Developers can better understand Microsoft's design patterns and our implementation methodologies. I think this can also help developers understand what is happening underneath the covers.
There are lot of benefits for developers, customers, partners, and Microsoft. when it comes transparency with source - it facilitates better communication and trust.